Feed Me, Seymour!

After a weekend being in good company of friends, being nourished in both body and heart, I find myself in the kitchen today. It feels like I’m making up for lost time. The week has been bubbling over with activity, so cooking a meal has been little more than an afterthought.
So, gifted with an extra hour in my day, I found myself laying in bed dreaming up what I wanted to make.
Something hot and stew-y, for sure, something sweet, and something with raw elements.
Garbanzo Bean Stew with Preserved Lemon
I wanted to create an unctuous, meat-free stew and had been pouring over recipes that paired game-y meats with fruit. I’ve had this thing for Moroccan spices lately and was dying to test out my recent batch of preserved lemon. I use garbanzo beans frequently for hummus and in salads, however I rarely use them in soups, preferring the many varieties of lentils available. Garbanzo beans are firm, nutty and can hold their own in a soup with lots of competing elements. Adding a bit of harissa heightens the flavors and adds extra heat.
This stew is stellar, and can be served with couscous, bread or another grain. I served it over quinoa to give it a bit of a protein boost and keep it a bit lighter, as I always like to keep room for dessert!
Garbanzo Bean Stew with Preserved Lemon
2 onions, sliced thinly
1/4 cup olive oil
3 c cooked garbanzo beans
2 32-oz cans whole plum tomatoes, chopped, juice reserved
1 preserved lemon, insides removed, chopped
3/4 cup dried Turkish apricots, quartered
1 Tbsp harissa
1 tsp cumin
1/2 tsp coriander
2 cinnamon sticks
2 c. vegetable or chicken broth
1 bunch kale, chopped
Method
1. Heat olive oil in a large pot over medium heat.
2. Add onion and cook ~15 minutes, giving a stir every few minutes to evenly caramelize.
3. Turn the heat up to high, and add all remaining ingredients except kale.
4. Once boiling, turn heat down and simmer for ~40 minutes.
5. Toss in kale, allowing it to steam for ~5 minutes, then fold into the stew.
6. Serve over cooked quinoa or couscous; with cilantro and harissa as garnish.
pomegranate arils

pomegranate arils

I also had this pomegranate I’d been meaning to break into. As I was waiting for my press to steep my coffee, I spotted the pomegranate and popped myself up onto the counter, knife in hand. A colleague taught me a fancy technique for scoring pomegranate so as not to bruise the fruit. I peeled back the flesh to reveal the plump juicy jewels inside. After plucking away for about 10 minutes, I had a nice full bowl of seeds. I could have easily gone with a simple arugula salad with pomegranate and toasted pistachios, however I also wanted to do a bit of roasting and satisfy my squash addiction. What I ended up with was truly gorgeous and flavorful as well; kale marinated in a lovely vinaigrette and tossed with roasted delicata squash and pomegranate seeds.
Kale and Delicata Squash Salad with Pomegranate Seeds

Kale and Delicata Squash Salad with Pomegranate Arils

Kale Salad with Delicata Squash and Pomegranate Arils

2 delicata squash, halved, seeded and cut into 1/2-inch crescents
olive oil
salt and pepper
1 large head lacinato (flat leaf) kale
Vinaigrette:
4 T olive oil
2 T apple cider vinegar
1 T lemon juice
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1 tap salt
1/2 tsp pepper
Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
Toss squash with a bit of olive oil (~2 tbsp), a generous pinch of salt and several grates of pepper. Roast for 40-45 minutes, giving a toss about halfway through so that the squash caramelizes evenly.
Wash kale and chop into ribbons. Set in a large bowl.
Combine vinaigrette; massage into kale. Add delicata and mix lightly. Fold in pomegranate seeds and garnish with pistachio seeds and chèvre.
Pear and Almond Cake

Pear and Almond Cake

Moving on to dessert. Initially, I’d planned to do something with pear and ginger, and then I recalled having a bit of almond flour in my larder. I discovered a recipe on food 52.com, which you can find the link here:
I made few deviations from the recipe, with exception of increasing the proportion of almond flour to baking flour and substituting olive oil for canola oil. This made for a dense, moist cake, which I served with some vanilla-scented creme fraiche. It was truly divine.
Much Love,
J

Love in the Time of Pastry.

Often, I feel a natural pull toward the kitchen to get creative and make something sweet. I have an insatiable sweet tooth, admittedly. This desire generally peaks after I’ve gotten home from a full day of activities, donned my sweats and T-shirt, and simply cannot bear the thought of leaving my cozy apartment to be assaulted by the bright lights of a grocery. Oh, and people. Not that I am an unsociable person, quite the opposite. It’s just that once I’ve expended my mental and emotional energy of the day, I need a respite. That’s when having a somewhat decently-stocked pantry comes in handy.

Given that it’s Fall, I naturally turn to more things like pastries and pies and cakes; something fruity and not too sweet. I surveyed my cupboard and had odds and bits of different types of flours, a few apples in the refrigerator and a stick of butter. What emerged is destined to repeat, for sure.

Image

These apple galettes are quite possibly one some of best mini pastries I’ve made; perfect for breakfast, after dinner, or pretty much any time of day, really.

Feel free to substitute a combination of flours with this one; I’m thinking rye flour might be a nice addition.  However, if using a dense whole-grain flour, don’t add more than ~1/3 cup, or you’ll need to play with the fat and liquid components of the pastry dough.

Ooh! And adding some candied ginger to the filling might be nice as well. I would go for about two tablespoons, and cut back on the sugar by equivalent volume. And I would hold off on adding the grated ginger, as is it might be a bit overpowering.

~Mise en Place

~Mise en Place

Apple Ginger Galettes

For the pastry:
2/3 c unbleached pastry flour
1/3 c whole wheat, rye, or Emmer flour
1 tbsp unbleached sugar
1/2 tsp sea salt
8 oz (1 stick) butter
For the filling:
4 apples, peeled, cored and sliced about 1/4 inch wide
1/4 c unbleached sugar
1 tbsp freshly grated ginger
1 tap cinnamon
1 tsp lemon zest
1 tbsp lemon juice
Additional ingredients
1 egg, beaten (for egg wash)
2 tsp coarse sugar, such as demerera
Method:
Preheat oven to 425 degrees F
1. Combine all of the filling ingredients; set aside.
2. Prepare the pastry; refer to this link for basic dough prep http://redflowerjlhcooks.com/2013/07/25/or-how-to-make-a-pie/
  1. Cut chilled dough into four equal pieces.
  2. Roll into ~1/8-in thin circles, You’ll want them to be about 8 inches in diameter.
  3. Line a baking sheet with parchment for the pastry, or put each circle onto individual parchment squares.
  4. Give the filling a quick stir to redistribute the juices, then scoop into the center of each pastry.
  5. Gently fold up about 1-2 inches, pinching each fold together to ensure a decent seal.
  6. Brush the edges of crust with egg, then sprinkle galettes with demerera (or other sugar on hand)
  7. Bake 15 minutes, then turn heat down to 350 degrees F.
  8. Check the pastry in about 20 minutes; if the crust is browning excessively, cover with foil.
  9. Cook another 15-20 minutes; apples should be juice and bubbly at this point.
  10. Remove from oven, cool slightly and serve.
Bon Apetit, and much love,
J

Feed your soul…

It’s good to get a girl out of the city. Just a couple of days, immersed in the awesome wonder and beauty of nature.

Necessary rejuvenation.
White Horse Mountain

White Horse Mountain

White Horse Mountain

Stillaguamish River

And so we drove to Darrington to spend the weekend at the family farm. Nestled on a hill overlooking a small pond, far away from city lights, acres of lush land, trees, nothing to hear but the sound of dragonflies snapping themselves against the glass-paneled walls, denied access to the indoors. Being greeted by the sweet smell of cedar as I enter the cabin. It’s enough to just take a deep breath and…exhale gratitude. It was exactly what I needed; a place of respite, a place to disconnect, to ground, and to eat!
Ooh! and kiss the goats.
Kissing the babies

Kissing the babies

 

Africa
I had a few ideas of what I wanted to make prior to our departure. First, I am obsessed with the new collaboration by Yotam Ottalenghi and Sami Tamimi; Jerusalem. I was gifted this cookbook, full of gorgeous color photos and mouth-watering delights. I aspire to cook every recipe in this book. This weekend I elected to make the Lamb Stew with Cannellini Beans. The broth had an unctuous, mildly sweet profile, and with 20 cloves of garlic (twenty!), surprisingly didn’t leave us smelling like stinking roses for the remainder of our stay. I accented the stew with some crushed cilantro, mixed with lemon, sugar, salt, chile, ground coriander and olive oil. It’s kind of like loose adaptation of Zhoug, a gremolata-style condiment. I must say it was perfect; it brought a citrusy brightness complementing the heft of the soup perfectly.
Lamb stew with cannellini beans

Lamb stew with cannellini beans

I’d been dying to make something sweet and cakey ever since last week’s incredible uber-blueberry cornmeal muffins (of which I’ll try to write a recipe as soon as I recall my method!). David’s mother sent me a clipping from the NY times which served as inspiration:  almond cake with figs; dense, honey-sweetened and rich with eggs and butter. I had a couple of perfectly-ripened peaches on hand, and so the recipe underwent a bit of metamorphosis. this peach-blueberry almond cake is something between a cake and a tart, perfect with afternoon tea, or eaten cold with some Greek yogurt for breakfast. We served it after dinner with a bit of freshly-whipped cream.
With fresh whip!

With fresh whip!

Peach-Blueberry Almond Cake

Peach-Blueberry Almond Cake

Peach-Blueberry Almond Cake
*Adapted from NY Times Fig and Almond Cake
Ingredients:
1 c almond flour
1/2 c unbleached pastry flour (or all purpose flour)
1/4 c fine sugar
1 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
3 eggs
4 Tbsp butter, melted
2 Tbsp honey
1 tsp lemon zest
1/2 tsp almond extract
1 med-large ripe peach, sliced into 1/4-inch crescents
1/2 c blueberries
Method:
  1. Preheat oven to 375
  2. Butter a 9-inch tart tin with removable bottom (line bottom with parchment, if you prefer).
  3. Combine all dry ingredients in medium-sized mixing bowl.
  4. To a separate bowl, whisk the eggs, honey, lemon zest and extract, then whisk in melted butter.
  5. Create a well in the center of the dry ingredients and fold in the wet mixture, stirring until just combined.
  6. Spread batter into tart pan. Fan peaches on top, leaving small amount of space between the slices. Toss the blueberries casually over the top, allowing them to roll into the crevasses.
  7. Sprinkle either a bit of Demerera sugar, or other granular sugar over the top (~3 teaspoons)
  8. Bake for ~30 minutes, until golden and firm to the touch.

Upon our return home, we made yet another of Yotam’s recipes for Cauliflower cake. You can find the recipe online. A savory cake, reminiscent of something between a quiche and a custard, this dish packs tons of flavor and is an excellent source of protein. I served it with a salad and a simple vinaigrette. So good!

Cauliflower Cake

Cauliflower Cake

With love (and full belly).

~J

Gimme Some Sugar…

Berry-Peach Tartlet with Elderflower and Lemon Cream

Berry-Peach Tartlet with Elderflower and Lemon Cream

Recipes showcasing summer berries abound, however, second to tasting a fresh berry off the vine, I find their marriage with pastry so effing satisfying. Berries erupt when heated, creating this saucy, syrupy goodness, when soaked into a rich buttery flaky pastry…there’s nothing like it.

I found myself with a small treasure of fresh berries and a couple of perfectly ripened peaches and that’s how it all started. See, I don’t typically enjoy fruit on it’s own, so when faced with bounty, I will either make jam, or some sort of crisp, biscuit, shortbread or pie.
I had a modest idea where this is going when I started. While my tart dough was resting away in the fridge, I peeled and diced the peaches and combined them with the berries, then let them macerate with a little bit of sugar, lemon and freshly grated ginger – lots of it.
Macerate. I use the term loosely, as I had intentioned to make this these little babies the same day. However, the sudden onset of a gastrointestinal bug sent me to bed for much of the afternoon.
Moving on…
frangipani (almond-custard)

frangipani (almond-custard)

 

 

Once I’d recovered my energy (and my insides), I set to work. I discovered a bit of frangipani in my freezer from a previous experiment, and thought that the almond flavor would make a nice addition to my tartlets.
Rather than encrust these beauties with another layer of dough, I set on a crumble that would be light enough and provide the right crunch, while not taking away from the juicy bits in the middle. I prepared a mixture of two parts oats, one part cornmeal one part sugar (demerara to be specific), maybe a teaspoon of freshly grated ginger, a good dose of cinnamon, a pinch of salt and some lemon zest. To combine it all, I took a couple tablespoons-ish each of butter and coconut oil, incorporating it all with a pastry cutter.
mini berry tartlets

mini berry tartlets

 

 

I lined about 6 mini-tart tins with dough, then blind baked at ~400 degrees for 12 minutes. Next I removed the tart shells from the oven and filled with a spoonful of frangipani, some berries, and lastly, packed the crumble on top. This baked for ~30 minutes at 350 degrees, until bubbly and golden.

For this recipe, you will need
~3 cups berries (fresh, or thawed from frozen, but seriously, use fresh right now because it’s summer)
2 peaches peeled sliced and diced
~2 generous tablespoons sugar (again I prefer the raw stuff)
~1 tablespoon of freshly-grated ginger
1 batch prepared pie dough (see earlier post)
crumble topping (see descriptive above, or just create one on your own!)
Serve with lemon-elderflower cream, or basic whipped cream.